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Love and Sex in the Age of Capitalist Realism: On Spike Jonze’s Her

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dc.contributor.author Flisfeder, Matthew
dc.contributor.author Burnham, Clint
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-16T19:39:52Z
dc.date.available 2018-04-16T19:39:52Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Flisfeder, Matthew, and Clint Burnham. "Love and Sex in the Age of Capitalist Realism: On Spike Jonze’s Her." Cinema Journal 57 (1) (Fall 2017): 25-45. DOI: 10.1353/cj.2017.0054. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0009-7101
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10680/1466
dc.identifier.uri https://muse.jhu.edu/article/672992
dc.description.abstract Spike Jonze’s Her (2013) is a film about a romantic relationship between a man and an operating system. Using a Lacanian and Žižekian psychoanalytic framework, we interpret this film in the context of what the cultural theorist Mark Fisher has called “capitalist realism.” Referring to the Lacanian thesis that “there is no sexual relationship,” we discuss the film’s unique treatment of our enjoyment of digital technology and how it deals with the parallel deadlocks of the sexual relationship and the work relationship. We address these topics by looking at how Her deals with the sexual relationship, love, work, and fantasy. The premise of the film is original—suited to the zeitgeist of the digital present—and we claim that it reveals important insights about processes of subjectivization. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher The University of Texas Press en_US
dc.title Love and Sex in the Age of Capitalist Realism: On Spike Jonze’s Her en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.description.version Postprint
dc.identifier.doi 10.1353/cj.2017.0054


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